Labelling Laws

RESEARCH AND PLAN FOR FAIR TRADE AS A NATIONAL STANDARD

In recent years, ethical, social, and environmentally friendly labels have become prolific. While this can be seen as a good thing, the various labels diverge dramatically when it comes to the rigour and impact of their associated standards. Developing a national standard for fair trade has the potential to reduce label fatigue and uncertainty in the marketplace, and also protect consumers. One label and one set of standards would bring clarity. As we explore this possibility, we will research how

  • the Organic sector (COTA and IFOAM) achieved harmonized labelling and standard consistency
  • France has approached the challenge of creating a national fair trade label
  • Halal successfully lobbied the Canadian government to legislate that any brand using the term “Halal” must be certified by a third party

We want to see the federal government take the following actions:

  • Investigate the feasibility of creating a national fair trade standard

IMPROVE TRANSPARENCY OF CORPORATE OWNERSHIP

We ask people to make purchasing decisions based on social values, but we don’t equip them with the right tools. With the global conglomeration of brands and labels, there is no real way for consumers to know which company they are actually buying from—unless they research each product and brand. This lack of transparency creates confusion and hinders our ability to purchase ethically and support companies who are acting in a socially and environmentally friendly manner.

We want to see the federal government take the following actions:

  • Legislate that corporate ownership must be included on all product packaging, so consumers can choose which companies to support